Paranormal TV: Psychic Investigators

I am mostly done watching season one of Psychic Investigators on Prime Video, and I am really enjoying it. When I started watching it, I was expecting it to be about psychics who crack unsolved crimes. So far, it isn’t like that at all. Instead, it is a true crime show that details how police investigate and solve murders, with a psychic giving his or her predictions alongside the investigation. In most episodes, the investigator or detective may accept the psychic’s input but doesn’t solve the crime with it. Only after the crime has been solved do the police look back and confirm how bizarre it was that the psychic was so bang on.


I am a sucker for stories about spirits and ghosts communicating from “the other side,” and Psychic Investigators has this kind of content in spades!

True Crime: The Candy Man

They called him the Candy Man. The always-smiling Dean Corll was known for passing out sweets to kids in the [Houston] Heights, where his family had a candy factory. But that smile was a mask, and behind it was one of the most brutal, calculating serial killers of the 20th century.

Elmer Wayne Henley and Dean Corll.

“Between 1970 and 1973, Corll—with two teenaged accomplices, Elmer Wayne Henley Jr. and David Owen Brooks—lured teen boys and young men into his car with promises of rides, drugs, and partying. Corll then tortured, raped, and killed his victims inside his rent houses and apartments across Houston. The spree ended only after Henley fatally shot 33-year-old Corll during the attempted rape of a victim on August 8, 1973. When police arrived, 17-year-old Henley confessed to his role in at least 28 murders—including six slayings he’d committed—and led investigators to unmarked graves throughout the Houston area.”

Workers, photographed at the southwest Houston boat shed Henley had directed them to, searching for more bodies in the Houston Mass Murders case on August 9, 1973. The object lying in the wheelbarrow was identified as the skull of the trio’s tenth victim, but it would take years to identify all of the bodies that were discovered at the three sites Henley told police about.

Read the whole story at Houstonia: The Candy Man Who Wasn’t So Sweet After All

Buddy and Tippi

“If you thought Tippi Hedren’s affinity for big cats was somehow rooted in revenge on birds, think again. According to the Dec. 4, 1962, edition of Look magazine — published prior to the 1963 release of her first Alfred Hitchcock film, The Birds, but after the harrowing scenes were shot in which the crew threw real birds at her — she accepted one of the creatures as a pet.

“The caption from the feature story, ‘Tippi Hedren: Hitchcock’s New Grace Kelly’ (with Tippi on the cover), reads: ‘Buddy, a pet raven, neatly lights Tippi’s cigarette. She grew so fond of him that she put a sign, ‘Buddy and Tippi,’ on her dressing-room door.'”

Read more at SCVTV: Tippi Hedren and Pet Raven, Buddy