Horror Cinema: Wrong Turn (2021)

I am a massive fan of the Wrong Turn franchise. The first film had a kick-ass heroine, and the following movies continually out-did themselves in gore and senseless killings, to my cheering it on. One of my all-time favorite horror scenes is the decapitation in the school gym in Wrong Turn 4, let alone the decapitation at the end of that movie on the snowmobile. So good.

When I saw that there was a new addition to the franchise, I watched it as soon as I could. Before turning it on, I looked up reviews to see if I could get a feel of what to expect, and I was warned that this movie was not going to be what a Wrong Turn franchise movie would usually offer. Reading that, I went into it disliking it. If I don’t have cannibals and a total kill count by the end of the movie, will I have truly seen a Wrong Turn movie?

I can’t say I hated it. I would consider it a light version of the franchise. The effort to pull the expected senseless gore into a storyline was difficult because what makes a Wrong Turn movie great is that the plot is just that some buggers take a wrong turn and get hunted and eaten by cannibals. Although I wasn’t loving the plot, I did like that it never lagged, and the conclusion was satisfying, even if it was simply the satisfaction of ending on an intense scene.

I also can’t say I’d watch this movie again, even if I wanted to introduce someone to the franchise. Not a big deal because the other versions will certainly continue to be in regular rotation for horror movie nights.

Nelson, Mike P. Wrong Turn (2021), Saban Films, 2021.

Horror Cinema: House (1977)

I waited for years before finally seeing Nobuhiko Obayashi’s House, and I think the excitement and expectations were too high for what the movie ended up being. I was expecting a mix between Dario Argento’s Suspiria and Tim Burton’s early 1980s Hansel and Gretel, which were both great and far superior than House. The majority of the good scenes were all in the trailer, except for my favourite, which was the eye in the mouth.

I guess I should have done more research into this movie other than watching trailers and hearing about how great it was from friends and family. Warning to those who have yet to see this, expect something more light-hearted with a light plot.

Obayashi, Nobuhiko. House, Toho, 1977.

Horror Cinema: Deadly Friend

Wes Craven’s Deadly Friend was the first horror movie that I watched as a kid from beginning to end. I might have been eight or nine. I vividly remember choosing the movie at the video store and feeling so daring to be choosing a horror movie. I’m not sure, but I think I was with my older brother or a babysitter because I don’t think either of my parents would have allowed me to watch it.

The basketball stood out as the part of the movie I would never forget. The actress who played the undead main character, Kristy Swanson, said that she had probably thrown the basketball over a hundred times during the re-shoot filming of Elvira’s death scene. She said, “Wes Craven kept at me to throw it as hard as I could to indicate great speed. I must have tossed that ball a hundred times. My arm sure felt I did.” She also said in an interview with Maxim magazine in May 2000 that the fake head was stuffed with actual cow brains that the production crew picked up from a butcher shop.

Learn more about the movie at IMDb Trivia: Deadly Friend.

Craven, Wes. Deadly Friend, Warner Bros., 1986.

Horror Cinema: I See You

I came across I See You on the streaming service Prime. I was mostly interested in it because of Helen Hunt, who I have been happy to see returning to television and movies (I recently watched the reboot of Mad About You and loved it). During the first third of the movie, I was suspicious of its dramatic moodiness: long shots of scenery or of the inside of the house where the story took place with spooky music reminiscent of Argento’s Suspiria or Kubrick’s The Shining.

I was pleasantly surprised when, halfway through, the story took an unexpected turn and the plot became enthralling right until the end. I appreciate when a story makes you see its characters in a new way, and this one did it in spades. I highly recommend it!

Randall, Adam. I See You, Saban Films, 2019.

Horror Cinema: The Boy II (Trailer)

A trailer for The Boy II was recently released. The Boy is one of my favourite horror movies (see my review Horror Cinema: The Boy), and I am really excited to see the sequel. What I enjoyed the most about the first movie was that it wasn’t a paranormal narrative. I am curious to see how the sequel handles the doll because it looks like the story will turn into a paranormal tale. But, maybe, like the first, that is simply a misdirection.