True Crime: Hell’s Belle Gunness

Norwegian-born Belle Gunness immigrated to the United States in 1881. A series of suspicious fires and deaths mostly resulting in insurance awards followed. Belle also began posting notices in lovelorn columns to entice wealthy men to her farm, after which they were never seen again. Authorities eventually found the remains of over 40 victims on her property, but Belle disappeared without a trace.

“She had killed 42 people. She would feed them a meal, poison their coffee and hit them with a meat chopper, alternating between burying the victims in shallow graves and feeding their remains to the hogs.”

Watch the following video for more gruesome facts about Belle Gunness’s devious crimes and murders:

Source for synopsis: biography.com – Belle Gunness

Five Hotels Haunted by Celebrity Ghosts

I recently returned from a trip to my favourite city, San Francisco. I particularly love the hippy neighborhood the Haight. I like to spend time there with the spirits of Janis Joplin, Jerry Garcia and Jimi Hendrix. I was interested to then see this video about hotels haunted by celebrity ghosts, among them the hotel in Los Angeles where Joplin lost her life to a drug overdose.

True Crime TV: See No Evil

One of my favourite true crime shows is Investigation Discovery’s See No Evil. I like experiencing a true crime narrative through recorded evidence, and this show is always packed with security camera videos, recordings of police interviews, and audio clips like emergency calls or tapped phone calls.

See No Evil on Investigation Discovery

The scariest and most unique aspect of this show is that the crimes happen to very charming, innocent people who happen to be at the wrong place at the wrong time. In most of the cases, because the violence was so random, finding leads outside of the victim’s social circle made it nearly impossible to identify a suspect. But, with the ever-seeing eye of CCTV, police are able to patch together very accurate timelines for the crimes.

See No Evil on Investigation Discovery

Sometimes bad things happen to good people, and it makes the terror of the show’s case files that much worse. Could happen to anyone at any time. I find myself hoping to be on camera when I’m in random places. If I’m going to be assaulted, I sure hope the attacker could be identified.

Abduction by Fairies

fairies“Most famously, the fairies were wrongly fingered as the chief suspect in the disappearance of Bridget Cleary, a 26-year-old cooper’s wife, in 1895. According to the transcript from the Irish Crime Records, which is kept in the National Archives, she went missing on the night of March 15. She had been killed by her husband Michael Cleary, her father Patrick Boland, her aunt Mary Kennedy, her cousins Patrick, William, James and Michael Kennedy, and John Dunne, and two men named William Ahern and William Simpson, and her body secretly buried. One week later, after an extensive search, her body was found by police about three quarters of a mile from her house.In-1895-Michael-Cleary-was-charged-with-killing-his-wife-Bridget-who-he-accused-of-being-a-fairy-changeling“After Bridget became seriously ill, her family said that she had been abducted by the fairies and replaced with a fairy changeling. To drive the changeling away, they tortured her over a number of nights. Bridget died of her injuries. It was a most extraordinary and unusual case, particularly because folk custom and legend about fairy changelings clearly indicated that fairy changelings should never be harmed, only threatened: if the fairies had the real person with them, they may retaliate harshly if the humans harmed the changeling they had left behind.”

from “Abductions by Fairies” on Ask About Ireland