Paranormal TV: Psychic Investigators, Season 2

In season 1 of Psychic Investigators on Prime Video, I found that the psychics did not influence the crime investigations. Rather, they paralleled them with their insights, and the show demonstrated how uncanny it was that they were correct in the end.

I was expecting the same in season 2, but the show delivered a different take on the topic. In these episodes, psychics directly influenced crime investigations, which was fascinating. If the psychics had not been involved in the cases, they would not have gotten solved. This was what I was originally expecting of the show—that psychics investigated crimes and helped solve them—so I was delightfully surprised to see it.

I would certainly recommend season 2—and, so far of what I watched of season 3—if you want to see psychics making a difference in solving crimes.

Paranormal TV: Psychic Investigators, Season 1

I am mostly done watching season one of Psychic Investigators on Prime Video, and I am really enjoying it. When I started watching it, I was expecting it to be about psychics who crack unsolved crimes. So far, it isn’t like that at all. Instead, it is a true crime show that details how police investigate and solve murders, with a psychic giving his or her predictions alongside the investigation. In most episodes, the investigator or detective may accept the psychic’s input but doesn’t solve the crime with it. Only after the crime has been solved do the police look back and confirm how bizarre it was that the psychic was so bang on.


I am a sucker for stories about spirits and ghosts communicating from “the other side,” and Psychic Investigators has this kind of content in spades!

True Crime: The Candy Man

They called him the Candy Man. The always-smiling Dean Corll was known for passing out sweets to kids in the [Houston] Heights, where his family had a candy factory. But that smile was a mask, and behind it was one of the most brutal, calculating serial killers of the 20th century.

Elmer Wayne Henley and Dean Corll.

“Between 1970 and 1973, Corll—with two teenaged accomplices, Elmer Wayne Henley Jr. and David Owen Brooks—lured teen boys and young men into his car with promises of rides, drugs, and partying. Corll then tortured, raped, and killed his victims inside his rent houses and apartments across Houston. The spree ended only after Henley fatally shot 33-year-old Corll during the attempted rape of a victim on August 8, 1973. When police arrived, 17-year-old Henley confessed to his role in at least 28 murders—including six slayings he’d committed—and led investigators to unmarked graves throughout the Houston area.”

Workers, photographed at the southwest Houston boat shed Henley had directed them to, searching for more bodies in the Houston Mass Murders case on August 9, 1973. The object lying in the wheelbarrow was identified as the skull of the trio’s tenth victim, but it would take years to identify all of the bodies that were discovered at the three sites Henley told police about.

Read the whole story at Houstonia: The Candy Man Who Wasn’t So Sweet After All

True Crime: Hell’s Belle Gunness

Norwegian-born Belle Gunness immigrated to the United States in 1881. A series of suspicious fires and deaths mostly resulting in insurance awards followed. Belle also began posting notices in lovelorn columns to entice wealthy men to her farm, after which they were never seen again. Authorities eventually found the remains of over 40 victims on her property, but Belle disappeared without a trace.

“She had killed 42 people. She would feed them a meal, poison their coffee and hit them with a meat chopper, alternating between burying the victims in shallow graves and feeding their remains to the hogs.”

Watch the following video for more gruesome facts about Belle Gunness’s devious crimes and murders:

Source for synopsis: biography.com – Belle Gunness

Five Hotels Haunted by Celebrity Ghosts

I recently returned from a trip to my favourite city, San Francisco. I particularly love the hippy neighborhood the Haight. I like to spend time there with the spirits of Janis Joplin, Jerry Garcia and Jimi Hendrix. I was interested to then see this video about hotels haunted by celebrity ghosts, among them the hotel in Los Angeles where Joplin lost her life to a drug overdose.