Bakeneko: Cat Spirits of Japanese Lore

Searching for scary Japanese ghosts, I came across the legend of bakeneko, cats that shape-shift into humans, or near humans. They are tormentors and tricksters.

They appear as a popular monster in kabuki productions, like the one pictured here.
kabuki-bakeneko
Visit Bakeneko — The Changing Cat on the Hyakumonogatari Kaidankai blog to learn all about this spirit’s origins and some of its stories.

Chucky’s Doll Blood Pact?

Did you know that in the original screenplay for Child’s Play, Chucky was the manifestation of Andy’s Rage?
chuckyThe iHorror.com blog explains: “In the original version of the film, Chucky would do Andy’s subconscious bidding. The original idea was to have Good Guy dolls that had latex skin and blood. If the kids ripped the latex skin, they could go out and buy Official Good Guy bandages. Being the lonely kid that he was, Andy would make a blood pact with the doll, and then comes to life whenever he goes to sleep. Chucky would take out anyone Andy saw as an enemy or a threat.”

Read four more facts about the movie on iHorror.com’s 5 Things You Didn’t Know About Child’s Play.

chucky-and-andy

Holland, Tom. Child’s Play. United Artists, 1988.

Leatherface: Origin

Leatherface is my favourite horror movie villain. He’s a mad, merciless, messy killer.

Did you know that the real-life killer who inspired The Texas Chainsaw Massacre’s Leatherface, Ed Gein, also inspired two other famous horror movie villains? According to chasingthefrog.com, his crimes also inspired Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho’s Norman Bates and The Silence of the Lamb’s Buffalo Bill.

Hooper, Tobe. The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Bryanston Pictures, 1974.

All of Them Witches: Rosemary’s Baby

Movie review
Roman Polanski’s Rosemary’s Baby

poster-rosemarys-baby

When pushed to answer what is my favourite horror movie, I reply, “Rosemary’s Baby.” I’ve watched it nearly once a year since I first saw it as a preteen.

One of the features that I particularly love about horror movies is that, sometimes, the bad guy wins. Growing up, I always wanted to read a comic or see a movie where the bad guy won in the end. It didn’t make sense to me that the hero always had to have the advantage.

After first seeing Rosemary’s Baby, I couldn’t believe what I was seeing in the final scene. It was grotesque and perfect: the Anti-Christ was born healthy and would be loved by his mother in a twisted, Satanic retelling of the immaculate conception.

My other favourite aspect of the movie is the psychological horror. Watching Rosemary unravel the secret that her neighbours are “all of them witches” and to watch her be fed to the wolves by the ones she loved and trusted most is, to me, the scariest possible thing that could happen to someone. It is also something that happens to women all the time, especially in the time that the movie was released. To me, it is an added layer of horror to watch her be treated as a possession knowing that the story is likely familiar to so many of my sisters and foremothers.

rosemarys-baby 1

Polanski, Roman. Rosemary’s Baby, Paramount Pictures, 1968.