Famous Accused Witch: Tituba

“It is likely you have heard this name from Arthur Miller’s The Crucible, but like many other characters in the play, Tituba was inspired by a real person. Although it’s unclear which South American country she originated from, Tituba was brought to the American colonies as a slave to Samuel Parris. During the 1692 Salem witch trials, Tituba was the first person accused of witchcraft by Elizabeth Parris and Abigail Williams.

“Initially, Tituba denied any involvement, but like so many of the accused, her will was quickly broken. Tituba admitted to the participation of an occult ritual, saying that she had baked a witchcake in an attempt to help her mistress, Elizabeth Parris. Tituba embellished her confession by adding details about her service to the devil, riding on sticks, and being told by a black dog to harm the children. Her testimony was both bizarre and frightening, as Tituba stated that she pinched the girls and had signed a devil’s book. Tituba, along with many others, was imprisoned for nearly a year, but managed not to be one of the women hanged for witchcraft.

“Tituba languished in prison for a year, as her [slave owner] would not pay her jail fees. Eventually, in 1693, an unknown individual purchased Tituba from the prison for the price of her jail fees. After this, the woman’s path disappeared from history.”

From 9 Famous Witches Throughout History

Freddy Krueger Prequel

“Even though this may seem like some bizarre dream that’s induced by Freddy himself, the man behind Texas Chain Saw Massacre and Poltergeist actually got to play around with Freddy Krueger. Rather than Tobe Hooper getting to dig into the more supernatural, postmortem side of Krueger, he curiously steps in to handle an unofficial prequel of sorts. There was a phenomenon during the late ‘80s and ’90s where popular horror franchises would be spun out into anthology series that would bear little resemblance to their film counterparts. Many horror fans are aware of the two-season oddity, Freddy’s Nightmares, but less are savvy to the fact that the show’s pilot is actually a Nightmare prequel featuring Englund himself. In ‘No More Mr. Nice Guy’ Hooper turns back the clock to when Krueger is on trial for his crimes. The episode is light on the horror but it does a good job depicting the chapter of Freddy’s life that leads to his violent death at the hands of an outraged mob. Hooper helms a bizarre little detour in Freddy’s lore here, but die-hard ‘Fred Heads’ are still going to want to check this out.”

Learn more about Freddy on ScreenRant’s 16 Things You Didn’t Know About Freddy Krueger.